Richard Coss

image of Richard Coss

Professor of Psychology

Departments

Psychology

Offices and Labs

Room 105 Young Hall
752-1626

Profile Introduction

Evolution of antipredator behavior, notably predator recognition; development of perceptual and cognitive systems; behavioral ecology; emphasis on small mammals, primates, ungulates, and humans.

Degrees

1973 PhD Psychology University of Reading, England
1966 MA Design University of California, Los Angeles
1962 BS Industrial Design University of Southern California

Research Interests

Evolution of antipredator behavior, notably predator recognition; development of perceptual and cognitive systems; behavioral ecology; emphasis on small mammals, primates, ungulates, and humans.

ProfessionalSocieties

Animal Behavior Society; International Society of Ecological Psychology

CBS Grad Group Affiliations

Animal Behavior

Specialties / Focus

Animal Behavior
  • Behavior Ecology and Sociobiology
  • Communication
  • Development

Graduate Groups not Housed in CBS

Ecology

Field Sites

Point Reyes National Sea Shore; Bodega Bay

Courses

PSC 155 Environmental Awareness (Fall)
PSC 127 Animal Cognition (Winter)
PSC 180B Research in Psychobiology (Spring)

Publications

5/21/2010 9:26:34 AM
  • Coss RG (1999). Effects of relaxed natural selection on the evolution of behavior. In S. A. Foster and J. A. Endler (Eds.), Geographic variation in behavior: Perspectives on evolutionary mechanisms. Oxford University Press, Oxford, pp. 180-208...
  • Ramakrishnan U and RG Coss. (2000). Recognition of heterospecific alarm vocalizations by bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata). Journal of Comparative Psychology. 114:3-12
  • Coss RG and U Ramakrishnan. (2000). Perceptual aspects of leopard recognition by wild bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata). Behaviour. 137:315-335
  • Hanson MT and RG Coss. (2001). Age differences in the response of California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi) to conspecific alarm calls. Ethology. 107:259-275
  • Coss RG, Marks S, and Ramakrishnan, U (2002). Early Environment shapes the development of gaze aversion by wild bonnet macaques (Macaca radiata). Primates 43, 217-222.
  • Coss RG and Moore M (2002). Precocious knowledge of trees as antipredator refuge in preschool children: An examination of aesthetics, attributive judgments and relic sexual dinichism. Ecological Psychology 14, 181-222.
  • Coss RG and Charles EP (2004). The role of evolutionary hypotheses in psychological research: Instincts, affordances, and relic sex differences. Ecological Psychology 16, 199-236.